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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 30
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
for us to survive, it teaches us what to avoid and lets us know when to seek medical help. at the same time, though it can create tremendous suffering. st. augustine once said the greatest evil is physical pain, 100 million americans live with it every day would yo would wouo doubt agree, pain knows no boundaries, regardless of age and race, beyond the physical symptoms the experience of chronic pain often leads to feelings of isolation and hopelessness. >> laura klein had been living with pain since a knee injury in 2008 and joins me this evening to speak about her experiences and incredible group of scientists are also here to discuss how we perceive and process pain, david bar stiewk of children's hospital and david julius of the university of california, san francisco, allan basbaum, also of the university of california san francisco, robert dworkin of the university of rochester and once again my cohost dr. eric kandel a nobel laureate, and a howard hughes medical investigator. >> our subject is pain. hrchl is really one of the great unmet medical needs and enormous problem in soc
, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, david ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many of which have been intercepted by the ir
at home! >> that future is out there! it is waiting for us! >> tonight, a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next generation so says james free man clarke. while all the world focuses on the election results, e we want to raise this question: where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth, and where is it going? the challenge for the next administration are both immediate and deep. no great country has sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with the fiscal cliff, partisan gridlock has prevented us from making the hard decisions about where we need to spend and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequality. while we remain the richest country in the world, the global economic order is rebalancing. the application of american power is changing as we have seen in the response to the arab spring. old alliances need redefining. the pivot to the east demands understanding between china and the united states and the realization that it is
policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually promises that are made on those understandings and commitments made to the united states as a way of making it more likely that promises made will be upheld. so i think there is a decent chance there is going to be a cease-fire, but in my experience in this part of the world and having been involved in a lot of n
. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> right here at home. >> that future is out there waiting for us. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global he
well but he allowed paula broadwell all of this access. all of us had access to general petraeus over the years when he wants us around and tell us something. but this was different. he really allowed her to go everywhere with him. he talked to her all the time. i've talked to many aides, they were concerned about it in afghanistan. they were concerned how it looked, the optics of having this woman all the time. they described her as gushy and inappropriate talking about his thoughts. you've seen her on several programs over the last week. and things she was saying about him. that made them uncomfortable. >> well like martha, i've known him for about a decade, covered him in these war jones. he's a disciplined man, a man with incredible force of will. as much as we talk about his counterinsurgency doctrine, when i think about what happened in iraq, it was really david petraeus' will power in that battle space in the way he changed people's expectations what was possible, what was striking. so to see a man of that intensity get involved with another very intense person paula broadwell,
in the flag of patriotism and corruption against the u.s. and on the taiwan issue and against japan, so the congress has taken place against a backdrop of rising military influence. >> rose:. >> and if i could ask richard on that to me it was a sign of some kind of order in the chinese process, rather than disorder to have this clean handover, the chairman of the military commission of not having jintao hang around for a year or two, it is a modest step of transparency and institutionalization? >> i think you can definitely argue that this basically reflects well on the system, they don't have the former leading hanging on by his fingernails in another important post, that is true. but -- and that is why some people compliment jintao for respecting the process but in ordinary power politics term, it certainly shows that jintao was a much weaker leader than we thought. >> we have never seen foreign policy statements from li keqiang be, scituate. >> we don't know how assertive the military should be. >> rose: reform. >> we don't know, that's what really comes -- and you have one of the be
. >> have hemingway call us and apologize to us, too. >> i'm getting fit for nicky. >> patrick, she left, she's gone. >> doc, i have one instinct. i come home from work, i see my wife in the shower, i pull the car pain back -- so, yeah, i snapped. >> hey, tiffany, it's pat, you look nice. >> thank you. >> look, i think you're pretty but i'm not looking. >> neither am i. >> that's confusing, he's dead. >> wait, what's happening? 6- >> what's this i hear about you getting out of the loony bin? >> i thought you said you had it together! you were solid. >> i am solid! i was solid at the game. >> hey! >> what the hell? >> i just wanted to be friends. >> how did you lose your job >> by having sex with everybody in the office. >> serve in >> i was very depressed. >> we don't have to talk about it. how many were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> she's my friend. why would you say that? >> there's this dance thing. i can only do it if i have a partner. >> i'm not going to dance with you. >> is this the girl you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> she's my friend with an "f." >
. and not just in the u.s. all over the world. this is a big global phenomenon. and it's now impossible to keep track of how every company and how people are using the internet. there's so much dynamism. that's what makes me optimistic that it's still at the very beginning. >> rose: and british actress keira knightley inhabits her latest tragic her win on anna karenina. >> doingpride & prejudice was frightening because that is the character people love some of and women want to be that anna is not that kind of a creature. she's a sort of very difficult jewel like creature but she's not somebody that people want to be. so from that kind of perspective it wasn't as terrifying as making on something like elizabeth bennett. but it was definitely challenging. she is a very odd one. >> rose: bezos and knightley when we continue. funding for charlry rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. dns-- jeff bezos is here, the c.e.o. of amazon.com. he founded the company in 1994 out of his garage as an on-line book
're going to give it away. so samsung, you want to have an operating system for your smart phones? use the android. and it's a very good operating system. so they have it. and google says what are we going to get out of that? they said in the short term we're obviously -- google search is going to be prominent on those smart phones and our search growth will rise and it has, by the way, they've grown because mobile -- >> rose: they've got a huge lead. >> 70% almost. a. b, they say at some point as they did to figure out how to make money in 2001, at some point we'll come up with a way to monetize this. that is the same view that mark zuckerberg has at facebook. we're going to put it out. we've got a billion people, a billion users on facebook, we'll figure out a way, just as google did in 2001 with ad words and ad sense, those little ads on the right-hand side that generate over $40 billion a year. and we'll figure out a way to do it. and, you know, will they? you know, maybe. and maybe not. but with that mass audience there's a good chance they will. >> rose: here's what's interesting
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
used to be thought and cruel and unusual is now different. >> that is rat it is applying the judge's notion of what ought to be. and what .. what ought to be is to be determined by the people, not by a very select segment of the people consisting -- >> rose: by that you mean the legislature? >> the legislature and the people who can modify to the constitution. i mean, it has an amendment provision, prestietionly because they envisioned that some future society may want to change things. but, you know, the key question, with regard to textualism andism meaning versus the opposite view, which is the constitution evolves and the supreme court says how it evolves. the key question is simply this. would the american people have ratified the document if it said the application of this document and what it means shall be whatever the supreme court says it means from age toçó age. nobody would have ratified that document. >> rose: it is a dead document to you? >> i like to say an enduring document. >> rose: but you don't say it is a living document? >> it is not living. it is not living.
on reporting this story. >> the most important thing i've learned is really how vulnerable so much us are. you don't have to report the story, you just need to look at the tv and sandy over the last few days. what's so amazing about the storm was the sheer size. it struck 50, 60 million americans and did so almost simultaneously and that really truly taxed the ability of any society to respond to that. you couldn't borrow personnel, new york couldn't take personnel from new jersey or connecticut because everyone was going to be hit at once. we're all in this together and you have to accept that fact. >> rose: there's this question also which is the argument that's been made over the last years with increasing velocity. it is that cyber attacks could produce some of the same results we're experiencing today by being able to damage the electric grid in an even more severe way. >> yes, absolutely. that's a scary thought. we've seen just what life is like with a few million people without power. you can see the grid go down in a large way, if it was not easy to put it back together again. of cou
. >> rose: or if they're playing notre dame. >> well, i don't want us to play notre dame this year. >> rose: what makes you think he doesn't go to the office on saturday and sunday? >> i go to the office on saturday. >> rose: but what you do at the office and at home is the same thing. reading and on the phone. >> i'm reading and thinking and on the phone and talking to friends. there's very little difference in saturday and sunday from the weekdays. a little more action during the week, though. (laughs) >> rose: this reminds me of what surprised you most about him in terms of advice. you asked him what was the worst advice? >> well, we were doing a big action. he was going to be on the cover and so i -- without truly knowing the answer to the question i said all right, now, tell me what is the best advice you've ever gotten in your life from anyone? and he proceeded to talk for a long time about the worst advice that he had ever gotten. so i went back and told my managing editor this, which probably kind of -- with my head down in thinking well i hadn't come back with quite the right thing
. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battleground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colorado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college moved from an advantage they had to a dem
and everything would be controlled not by us, but by the editor. >> there is the theatrical function of building to that crescendo in that we have to be speaking at such a volume that catherine hears it to come down the stairs and say "why are you fighting?" so you know, again talking about the structure of the play, one thing feeds neatly into another which in film, you could play, you could cut away and there would be katherine upstairs. >> her listening. >> yeah. >> you see things from her point of view more. >> rose: what is the best medium for telling stories? >> radio. ( laughter ) >> rose: you love voice, don't you. >> well, when we talked about this with the edward r. murrow thing, his resistance to television, or to the visual was that as soon as you put a visual on top of a sound, you skew the meaning. and that is not his words, but that is sort of my -- >> it pure imagination, radio the actor in the studio is wearing his own clothes, imagining he is in a house, you in your home are managing a scenario with probably a different set of clothes or maybe no clothes at all sometimes. where
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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